Thursday, March 19, 2015

Jill Jacobs




Jill Jacobs
Interconnected Vessel
2015
Steel
18" x 28" x 28"

I create and utilize steel vessels to express the concept that drives all of my art forms: Interconnectedness. The vessels represent the individual, made up of the same materials, but through unique constructions and beautiful flaws, they each develop their own character. Like the human form, vessels are intended to be filled, having the potential to hold, or create, anything. As I connect the vessels into a united form, they become the individuals that cohere to one another to establish a society as a whole. They lose a portion of their individuality to serve the greater good and take on a larger meaning. 
Yet I believe Friedrich Nietzsche said it best when he declared:
"I walk among human beings as among the fragments of the future; that future I see. 
And all my creating and striving amounts to this, that I create and piece together into one, what is now fragment." 

Jamie Noce



Untitled 
2015
PVC Sheeting, Screen printed images
4' x 2'

When a person's individualized fingerprints are taken out of the equation, the image and symbol for identity; the handprint, cannot be linked to any specific person.   Using the mechanical process of screenprinting, which removes the artists hand, I had the ability to replicate the same image over and over again, ultimately losing the individual hand where the mass distorts the viewers perception through the clear PVC.









Brittany Katz 
The foxes
2015
wire, foam, sculpey, faux fur, acrylic paint


Theses foxes are a pair and are part of a larger piece. I wanted to create some realistic figures but alter them in little ways so that they are subtly different from reality. They are meant to catch the viewers attention in that they are non-human creatures that are acting and standing in a very human way. It is a throwback to how companies like Disney would animate animal characters to be representative as humans and act the same way.


Matthew Cristello




" He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you."-Friedrich Nietzsche.
 
Deep introspection can lead through many dark corridors of the mind. When unchecked, a passing thought becomes ravenous, consuming the conscience until all but a singularity remains. One might ask if it is better to look into oneself from afar, or to face ones demons head on. The truth however remains the same, no matter the vantage point. Gaze carefully.

Matthew Cristello
Into the Abyss
2015
Wax
9"x 6"

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Scott Levitt








Zen gardens tend to be contextualized with eastern subjects; this one however, resides in a Westerner's home. The original structure and functionality conveys a theme of Zen, yet the failure of the owner to upkeep the sand in its pristine and original condition nods toward the ethnocentrism of the western world, ultimately portraying the notion of neglect.

Scott Levitt 
EM: AiA
2015
Poplar, Sand  
2' x 1'  


Cristian Vitale





Memories
2015
wood, picture frames.

While looking over home videos, I stumbles upon a video of my mother who has since passed away. In the video she speaks the camera saying "Come see me, I miss you, write to me a long letter, long..." this clip was the inspiration for this memory altar where people can upload their memory too. I want to highlight thought this work the value of the technology we carry with us and the memory we are able to to store for later use. It is not until certain events take place that certain videos or images become invaluable.

Monday, March 16, 2015

Megan Fortman




Megan Fortman
Grasp on Life
2015
Soil, unfired clay, flower pots, water
6' x 6' x 2'










Impermanence and the passage of time are inevitable. When we try to hold on to time, it seems to slip faster and faster through our hands. When we appreciate each moment for all that it is time can stretch an eternity. 

video

Audrey Landmark


Audrey Landmark 
Nest 
2015
Steel, Twine 
3' x 4' 

I wanted to create an orb that grew out of organic shapes and had a sense of structure but airiness. This piece grew out of deformed circular cuts of steel pipe and the form developed out of the process of piecing the ovals together.

Friday, March 13, 2015

Ana Jackson Chaves



Ana Jackson Chaves
Clock Mechanism

2015
Steel and wood
3' x 10"x 4"

Humans have been obsessed with keeping time for ages. We spend hours every day staring at wall clocks or staring at the time on our phones, but we do not think about what mechanisms are driving these things that we rely on so dearly. My fascination with mechanical sculptures led me to research the components that make up a clock, specifically the grasshopper escapement. Experimenting with mechanical movements, I made a simplified model of a pendulum clock. Instead of keeping track of time, this sculpture focuses on the way the parts of a pendulum clock fit together. I used steel and wood in order to combine the impreciseness of nature with the precision of steel. 

Thursday, March 12, 2015

Aocheng Shi





Aocheng Shi
 Containers
Spring 2015
Paper
7' x 5' x 4'


Peolple aways take something for granted. Sometimes they think that they know something, but actually they don't. However, one thing does not only have one dimension. It needs various points of view to figure out what it is.

Brittany Paolella




Brittany Paolella
Shadowed Distance
2015
Glass
48" x 26"

This piece is a re-creation of a previous piece I created about a year prior. The former piece was composed of oil paint on canvas. This piece is created, simply, using two panes of glass, but the meaning is in the shadow that is projected on the wall. On the pieces of glass are etchings of blueprints - one of my room from home in New Jersey and the other of my room I currently reside in at the University of Delaware. The projected shadows are the main part of the piece representing the significance of the distance between the two places. They blueprints start in the same position on the separate panes of glass and slowly pull away from each other in opposite directions.

Geometric Growth

Geometric Growth
Spring 2015
Emily Greene
Metal Rods, spray paint, acrylic paint
Entire space: 10ft x 6ft
Individual structures range from 3.5ft x 2ft x 2ft to 1ft x 1ft

Behind every natural, organic form there is a unique basic structure.
The patterns and geometric designs that make up these simple molecules are equations for masses as large as the ocean. In order to create a whole, these small pieces must bind together, creating an inseparable relationship. Even us as humans are part of this exact foundation. The idea that particles broken down into their most basic forms can help us understand the broader significance of geometric forms in nature.

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Rebecca Guzzo




Rebecca Guzzo
Fractions
2015
Steel, wood, spray paint, wood stain
5' x 5' x 5' 

Experimenting with combining 2D and 3D material, I played with the form of a dimensional collage. Each material was treated and processed differently and placed to create dimension and form. The wooden triangles are self supportive and can be taken apart and rearranged. The concept of fractioning developed through my process, the idea that as humans we break off into stereotypes by race, gender, sexual orientation, when realistically we are all the same. Regardless of our external appearance we are all humans.