Friday, April 20, 2018

Angles of Aokigahara








 Angles of Aokigahara

 Hydrocal (white gypsum cement), Steel and Aluminum
6' x 5'9"

Dedicated to those who dwell in Aokigahara forest as they went there to find peace that they could not find in life. The locals who live in Yamanashi near Aokigahara call it Jukai which translate to Sea of Trees. The Aokigahara forest is about 13.5 square miles with old growth, over 300 years old and is green all year round. It is called Jukai because the forest seen from above looks like a rolling sea. We in the western society know it by a different name which I will not mention out of respect.

Sunday, March 18, 2018

Andrew Gayda



Left Overs
2018
Fleece, Carpet
6" x 9' x 5'

A soft sculpture that represents detached feet and arms. A mess of parts piled on top of one another laying out on a carpet. This piece gravitates toward feelings that are playful and unsettling. It has inviting qualities and an approach with caution take on it's observation.

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Maggie Heffernan




Earth and Air
2018
Steel and Nylon String
My process was working with steel to create an abstract interpretation of the connection between earth and air. Using angled steel for the bottom pieces allowed for a rough texture to represent the earth, while the string connects the earth to the circle representations of open space and air. 


Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Caity Serva


  





Pomeranian Skin Rug
2018
2" x 18" x 2'
Yarn, plastic mesh
I think taxidermy is a strange art form but even stranger are the people who decide to decorate their homes with these dead animals. I am interested in the distinction between which animals are decorative to have in your home, like a deer head mounted on the wall or a bear-skin rug, and which would be taboo, like a mounted cat or a dog-skin rug. In this project I wanted to explore a fur-making technique and see how realistic I could make the fur so that later I can experiment with making faces, paws, and ears. 

Monday, March 12, 2018

Taylor Schomp













Blue Drips

2018

12' x 5' x 3'

wire, brown glass bottles, string, watered own blue acrylic paint, unfired clay, plexiglass


Blue water, of varying shades, slowly drips unto dried cracked clay from bottles hung on the ceiling.  As the liquid drips on to the clay, it gradually deteriorates the clay, eventually exposing the plexiglass underneath.  The blue water dyes the clay surrounding the exposed plexiglass.  As more time passes, the cracked clay gets further coated in blue liquid.  By the time all of the bottles empty, nearly all of the clay is dyed blue.





Erin Erskine




Untitled 
2018
6'x2'x2'
Steel

This structure is to make one feel uncomfortable around it. The top half seems so much heavier than the bottom and creates an uneasy balance, that make it easy to sway back and forth but still manages to stay up right. The inside are rods going in every direction that have been worn down and starting to be worn down like how the top has started to cave in upon itself.



Christopher Giuliano





"Beer and Fishing" 

Bottle caps, fishing hooks, cylinder clips, nails, wood panel

My process for this was never definite.  I picked up a lot of ideas along the way, my concepts changed, and this was the final product.  I am very happy with it.  I sought for shine, elegance, and craftsmanship.  I also wanted to twist in the two elements of fishing and beer: two things that go hand in hand.  

Adele Kaczmarek





Double Sift
2018
screen, nylon stretch fabric, wire, flour
80" x 45" x 30"

Exploring movement, suspension, size and new material. I've experimented further into the idea of capturing a material that isn't easy to control and seeing how it interacts with a space. Seeing how the concept of action and manipulation could effect the flour and create a visual interaction. From ceiling to floor, the piece brings the eye through the entirety of the space. It creates a circling current from the suspended material to the flour sifts on the floor and back again. When the fabric hangs still, the flour defies gravity, but when force is applied, the flour is sifted through the undersized holes in the fabric and the screen before hitting the floor in an air-like dust.